Is it normal for my heels to hurt?

Heel Pain

Is it normal for my heels to hurt? The short answer is, No! Usually heel pain is caused by a condition called plantar fasciitis, which in laymen terms means, inflamed ligament like structure on the bottom of the heel. This condition can be extremely debilitating if left untreated. The good news is that it responds extremely well to conservative treatment. This condition is extremely common, and I would say I spend half my day treating plantar fasciitis. When the pain is minimal, stretching, icing, and taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, is usually enough. Once the pain advance from the mild to moderate stage, more advanced treatments are often needed. These range from: ultrasound guided steroid injections, MLS laser therapy, botox, orthotics, PRP, shockwave therapy, and night splints. There are other conditions such as: tarsal tunnel syndrome, calcaneal stress fracture, and rupture of plantar fascia that could also be causing the pain either isolated or in conjunction. Surgery is rarely required, but when it is, it can be done endoscopically with a single suture and minimal down time. Contact Dr. Gabriel Maislos at Houston Foot & Ankle Care to learn more about this condition and the latest advancements. Dr. Maislos currently is one of a handful of providers in the country offering botox treatment for plantar fasciitis.

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Houston Foot and Ankle

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